August 11, 2002

Lynn Marie Models in a River (Ingramport River, Nova Scotia)

Lynn Marie and I worked together in May, but, as is often the case, it wasn't until three months later that we managed to co-ordinate our schedules enough to return to working together.
8"x10" film
The day was bright and sunny, so I decided to try to work at Canaan River, where I knew there was good tree cover over part of the river, which would provide enough shade to soften the light of the afternoon. As I had hoped, when we arrived Lynn Marie found the water more then warm enough for full immersion, which greatly increased the number of poses open to us. While the river was not as high as I would have wished, there was still enough moving water to provide the white highlights that I enjoy working with so much.
4"x10" film
As Lynn Marie and I worked, she became more and more comfortable working in the water. At first, her poses were hesitant and cautious, as she moved gingerly on the small rocks and boulders to find spaces in which she felt comfortable. As the first couple of images were made however, Lynn Marie gradually grew more accustomed to what I was looking for in a pose, and grew in confidence. This very swiftly changed the images from ridged, posed looking compositions to photographs that took full advantage of the flow of the body and the landscape both.
4"x10" film
The real jewel of the session arrived as we were working in a shallow patch of fast-moving water. Working with a wide-angle lens, I was exploring the flow of the river over Lynn-Marie's back and hips, but was frustrated by how much of the forest above the water I was capturing in my composition - if I framed the image without the forest, the distortion of Lynn Marie that resulted from pointing the lens downwards was quite pronounced, yet when I pointed the camera forwards to keep the perspective on the Nude figure correct, there was too much above her to make the image as I intended.
4"x10" film
It was only after a couple of minutes of struggling that I remembered by split dark-slide, that permits me to make two 4"x10" images one above the other on a single sheet of 8"x10" film. Very quickly, I composed the image on half of the film, and made an exposure that totally ignored the upper part of the image on the ground glass. The results were exactly what I sought after, and even better, because I could get two images on the sheet of film, I made a second exposure with an even longer eight-second long exposure. The right tool at the right place helped me make the most striking image of the session.

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